Australian government policy on the entry of Vietnamese refugees, 1976 to 1978
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Australian government policy on the entry of Vietnamese refugees, 1976 to 1978

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Published by Griffith University, School of Modern Asian Studies, Centre for the Study of Australian-Asian Relations in Brisbane, Qld .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Australia,
  • Australia.,
  • Vietnam.

Subjects:

  • Refugees -- Australia.,
  • Refugees -- Vietnam.,
  • Australia -- Foreign relations.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementNancy Viviani and Joanna Lawe-Davies.
SeriesResearch papers / Griffith University, School of Modern Asian Studies, Centre for the Study of Australian-Asian Relations,, no. 2, Research paper (Griffith University. Centre for the Study of Australian-Asian Relations) ;, no. 2.
ContributionsLawe-Davies, Joanna.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHV640.4.A78 V57 1980
The Physical Object
Pagination43 p., [5] leaves of plates :
Number of Pages43
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3522785M
ISBN 100868570826
LC Control Number82106913

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The vast majority of refugees from Vietnam, however, arrived in Australia by plane after selection by Australian officials in refugee camps established throughout South-East Asia. Since , Australia has become home to a thriving Vietnamese community. In , the national census showed that , people in Australia were born in Vietnam. Vietnamese refugees scramble from a sinking boat in Malaysia, December A surge in Vietnamese immigration to Australia after the Vietnam War was the first test for multiculturalism after the. The term White Australia policy was widely used to encapsulate a set of historical policies that aimed to forbid people of non-European ethnic origin, especially Asians (primarily Chinese) and Pacific Islanders from immigrating to Australia, starting in Governments progressively dismantled such policies between and Competition in the gold fields between British and Chinese. Up until there were fewer than 2, Vietnam-born people in Australia. Following the takeover of South Vietnam by the North Vietnamese communist government in April , Australia, being a signatory to the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, agreed to resettle its share of Vietnam-born refugees under a refugee resettlement plan between and

Author of The Indochinese In Australia, , The Abolition of the White Australia Policy, and Australian Government Policy On The Entry Of Vietnamese Refugees, To /5(1).   Refugees in Australia: Selected full-text books and articles Politics as Cruelty: Asylum Seekers, Australian Government Policy and the Federal Election By Maddox, Graham Social Alternatives, Vol. 38, No. 2, April 1, In April and May, the Royal Australian Air Force evacuates Vietnamese refugees and the Whitlam Government announces categories of Vietnamese citizens who are eligible for temporary entry into Australia: spouses and children of Vietnamese students already in Australia; spouses and under year-old children of Australian citizens subject to. The Convention relating to the Status of Refugees (the Refugee Convention) is the key international legal document defining who is a refugee, their rights and the legal obligations of countries that are signatories to the Refugee Convention. Article 1A(2) of the Refugee Convention defines a ‘refugee’ as.

Viviani, Nancy and Lawe-Davies, Joanna , Australian Government Policy on the Entry of Vietnamese Refugees to , Centre for the Study of Australian–Asian Relations, Griffith University, Brisbane, p. .   History has shown us the value refugees can bring to our society (note the Vietnamese, Cambodian, Polish, Hungarian, Yugoslavs, etc.), and are likely to do more for a .   In the government of Prime Minister Paul Keating of the Australian Labor Party introduced a policy of mandatory detention in the wake of an increase in would-be Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese refugees. The policy — which remains today — requires asylum seekers be held in mandatory detention while they await a decision on their. Australian government policy on the entry of Vietnamese refugees, to , [Nathan Q.]: Centre for the Study of Australian-Asian Relations Griffith Univeristy. Williams, J. R. and Morris, J. Homecoming: images of Vietnam, Nambour, Qld: Homecoming Publications.